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NFT platform allegedly sells artists' songs without permission

NFT platform allegedly sells artists’ songs without permission

MUNA, Jackie Venson
Photo: Michael Loccisano (Getty Images), SUZANNE CORDEIRO/AFP (Getty Images)

Dozens of artists woke up on Tuesday morning to news that their music had been listed on NFT platform HitPiece without their knowledge or the proper licensing. HitPiece, a website claiming to let fans buy their favorite songs in the form of environmentally unfriendly NFTs, was accused of stealing its listings and potentially scamming buyers. The event has sparked outrage across Twitter from artists such as Jack Antonoff, Muna, and Adult Mom.

Prior to today, the website offered buyers the opportunity to bid on “One of One NFT for each unique song recording.” However, it’s unclear how they are selling the NFTs or if they even received authorization. It’s not just smaller indie artists music that can be found on the site either. There’s also music from known NFT-haters Brian Eno and Kanye West.

Producer and Bleachers frontman Antonoff took to Twitter, writing, “Any bleachers NFTs are fake. at the moment i do not believe in NFTs so anything you see associated with me isn’t real.”

“Bottom feeding scavengers of late capitalism sucking the last marrow from our bones and/or running a scam on me, you, or everyone, because obviously, I didn’t approve this, and apparently neither did anyone else you’ll see on the site,” tweeted musician Ted Leo.

Sadie Dupuis of the band Speedy Ortiz tweeted, “hey you stupid fucks @joinhitpiece we don’t have any deal with you or any NFT site and there SURE DOES LOOK like an active auction going on for a speedy ortiz song.”

Austin-based singer-songwriter Jackie Venson also shared that her music had been listed, tweeting, “These people have taken my entire catalog and put it up for sale as NFT’s without my knowledge or consent. I saw many other artists on their site too. Modern day thieves. As if it wasn’t hard enough to be a musician in this era.”

In addition to the growing number of artists who are speaking out about their music being found on the platform, record labels such as Sooper Records, Needlejuice Records, and Sunday Dinner Records have voiced their dismay at the website, saying any sale associated with any of their artists is unauthorized.

After all of the controversy raised, HitPiece wrote in a Notes app letter, “Clearly we have struck a nerve and are very eager to create the ideal experience for music fans.” HitPiece also noted that the artists, who say they did not consent to the listings, will in fact get paid from the sale.

The A.V. Club has reached out to HitPiece for comment.

This content was originally published here.